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Episode 36: Enoch Omololu: Helping Newcomers Become Savvy New Canadians

Podcast posted on by Evelyn Ackah in Podcast

Episode 36: Enoch Omololu: Helping Newcomers Become Savvy New Canadians

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November is Financial Literacy Month in Canada. Evelyn spoke to Enoch Omololu, DVM, MSc, whose passion is to help newcomers to Canada with their personal finances. Enoch is a veterinarian and the resident personal finance expert at Savvy New Canadians. He has a master’s degree in Finance and Investment Management from the University of Aberdeen Business School (Scotland) and has completed several courses and certificates in finance, including the Canadian Securities Course. He also has an MSc. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Manitoba and a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of Ibadan.

Enoch has been helping others win with their personal finances and has been writing about money matters for over a decade. His writing has been featured or quoted in The Globe and Mail, Winnipeg Free Press, Wealthsimple, Financial Post, Toronto Star, Credit Canada, MSN Money, National Post, CIBC, and many other personal finance publications.

Evelyn and Enoch cover a range of Canadian personal finance and immigration issues including:

  • You’re a Doctor of Veterinary medicine. What was your journey, and what led you to launch a personal finance website?
  • What are some of the biggest financial frustrations you’ve seen Canadian newcomers experience?
  • What happens after they get here? Building credit. Buying a home. Setting a budget. Saving for retirement. How is personal finance the same for newcomers - and how is it different?
  • How do you make money now, to turn this into a money-making business?
  • You have millions of website visitors each year - that's impressive. They can’t all be immigrants. Why do you think native born Canadians also visit Savvy Canadians?
  • You’ve also authored several personal finance guides and eBooks.
  • Many highly educated immigrants are coming in, business owners from other countries coming in, but yet they're starting all over again. They need to learn how we can create a financial legacy for our children, the next generation.
  • If an immigrant is successful financially, the chances are that their descendants are going to also succeed.
  • How do you see the financial needs of immigrants changing after they’ve lived in Canada 5, 10, 15 years and longer?
  • Immigrants have taken advantage of those opportunities to grow businesses, establish themselves, become employers themselves.
  • If you could share one piece of financial advice with immigrants before they arrive in Canada, what would that be?
  • Developing a money mindset.

About Evelyn Ackah

Evelyn Ackah is the Founder and Managing Lawyer at Ackah Business Immigration Law. We work with individuals and business owners from all over the world who want to cross borders seamlessly. For more information on immigration to Canada or the United States, Ask Evelyn Ackah at Ackah Business Immigration today at (403) 452‑9515 or email Evelyn directly at contact@ackahlaw.com.

Transcript

Evelyn:
This is Evelyn Ackah from Ask Canadian Immigration Lawyer Podcast. I have the pleasure today of welcoming Enoch, and I'm going to see if you can help me with Omololu. Is that right?

Enoch Omololu:
Yeah. You got that right.

Evelyn:
Thank you. He is the founder of a personal finance site that is focused on helping newcomers to Canada, and it's called Savvy New Canadian. Welcome, Enoch, and I really appreciate you making time.

Enoch Omololu:
Thanks for having me on this podcast, Evelyn.

Evelyn:
So, tell me a little bit about why you started this and when you started this finance website, personal finance? What was the need you thought that was missing for new immigrants?

Enoch Omololu:
So when I first arrived in Canada, I had been interested in finance already. So finance has been one of those things I was interested in over time, from growing up in a family where my parents were very financially savvy. So over time, even while in vet school, I was interested in finance. But upon getting to Canada in particular, what happened is of course, settling in, all those initial years, you get dragged in different directions. And then once I had a bit more time to actually think and breathe a bit more comfortably, then I was looking into personal finances in Canada, and I realized that I didn't know a lot, because for example, things like the TFSA, I realized, you know what, I've been here for two years. This is the first time I'm coming across the name tax free savings account.

Evelyn:
Yeah. Tax free savings account.

Enoch Omololu:
Yeah. So then I realized, you know what, I understand these things intuitively just because of my background, but then I had friends and family members who had no clue what these things referred to. So Savvy New Canadians, when I started it in 2016, the intention was to one, document for myself what I was learning, so I could go back and read my own summaries, as well as have a resource point I could point others to, newcomers, instead of having to answer everybody's question and then repeating myself over and over again. So, that was the intention initially. And obviously from there, it grew beyond my own wildest imaginations actually.

Evelyn:
That's incredible. I think you're right. Obviously, as an immigration lawyer, even if people are coming as professionals like yourself and educated people, it's all new world in Canada and I think it's a wonderful resource. I'm going to be sharing it with our clients because they need to understand what they need, even establishing credit again and all of those things, it takes a long time before you can buy a house. I hear them coming back to me and asking me all questions, and I can only help so much as a lawyer. So I think your website is going to provide some valuable, valuable information to clients of Ackah Law.

Evelyn:
But let me just ask you, you're a veterinarian by profession, so tell me a little bit about that journey, because coming as a professional, I know is not easy when you're foreign trained. Tell me about your journey and then why you've decided just recently that you're committing 100% to your website.

Enoch Omololu:
Yeah. I will be honest with you, it wasn't an easy journey. Becoming a veterinarian required me to have gone through six years of veterinary school back in Nigeria. And prior to that, I also had a degree or a certification as an animal health technologist. So that was two years. So overall, I spent eight years basically studying for veterinary medicine. And then upon arriving in Canada in 2011, I came in on a fellowship as a student.

Evelyn:
Great.

Enoch Omololu:
So I spent two years doing a master's degree in Manitoba. Following that, the next step was to start working. But of course, as a veterinarian from Nigeria, you can't just come into Canada and work as a veterinarian. So I went through two years of exams that cost me tens of thousands of dollars. Once I passed those exams though, then I was able to start working as a veterinarian and already I was with the government of Manitoba as a food safety inspector. So following getting my license here in Manitoba in Canada, I can also work in the US as a veterinarian. I got a veterinary job as a provincial livestock veterinarian for the province of Manitoba, and I did that from 2015 up until September this year.

Enoch Omololu:
But as of September this year, my website had become too busy. So really, I was running 100 hour plus weeks for the last couple of years, and it was starting to have a toll on my personal life.

Evelyn:
Of course.

Enoch Omololu:
Because people have questions. Every day I probably get emails in excess of 100 emails.

Evelyn:
Yeah, I believe it.

Enoch Omololu:
So it's comments on the website. People are looking for answers. And yeah, you try to get people to work for you, but you have to also manage them. So in a full time job, it just becomes impossible.

Evelyn:
Wow.

Enoch Omololu:
As of middle of September this year, I'm currently committing 100% to the website and see how that goes in the near future.

Evelyn:
That's great. That is quite the journey. And you know what, I totally know how difficult it is, Enoch, as immigrants come, they're so educated back home and then the journey just goes on and on. And so I really commend you for through all that. It's like the foreign trained lawyers that I have mentored in the past and articled with, just because they need to redo it all over again or part of it, it's incredible. So I find it really incredible that you're so committed to your Savvy New Canadian website, that you would just say, "I'm going to to throw it all in and give it a go and see if I can, I'm sure, hopefully down the line, monetize it significantly." So I think that's wonderful.

Evelyn:
Tell me just generally, what are the biggest financial challenges you see, or frustrations for new Canadians when they come to Canada?

Enoch Omololu:
I think to start off, it's often employment. So people come into Canada. Many of the people that Canada actually brings in or accepts through the economic immigration schemes are highly educated people. So these are highly educated immigrants all potentially coming to Canada. And they may, in some cases, or in many cases, have difficulties getting jobs that commensurate with their educational background. So I come across a lot of people who, of course, that's a frustrating aspect because you spent all these years. And I also went through the same thing - years in school, you get to Canada. There are opportunities everywhere in Canada, but then you also have to work again towards getting those opportunities to work for you because-

Evelyn:
Yeah, there are real barriers.

Enoch Omololu:
There are real barriers. Yeah.

Evelyn:
The law, professional, accounting, engineering barriers to admission.

Enoch Omololu:
Yes. Oh yeah. And again, because you're trying to now convert your degree into a Canadian accepted degree, you're also going to spend money. So you don't have a job, but then you're going to spend money on taking all these exams. Like I mentioned, I spent well over $15,000 taking-

Evelyn:
I can believe it.

Enoch Omololu:
... my board exams. So that, I think is the main challenges. You start off looking for reliable, good employment that actually matches your skills, and then to get that done, you're potentially spending a lot of money, which if you don't have it, could potentially prevent you from ever working in the field you actually started in. So, that's, I think, the main-

Evelyn:
The biggest frustration. I remember when I worked in Toronto on Bay Street for years, it's the same in Calgary, but there it was more so, every taxi driver was a doctor, a lawyer, an accountant from back home and everywhere, whether they're from India, Pakistan, Africa, Ghana, Nigeria. I saw so many, China. They were so well educated and I just realized what a tragedy it was that we weren't able to take advantage of their services fully and use them the way that we're meant to use them. So I hear you on that front for sure.

Evelyn:
What about when they get here? Let's say they do get work because many people hopefully are coming in under a federal skilled worker or some kind of program as permanent residents, or they're coming as workers already. How do they go about the process of establishing credit? How do they get to buy homes? How do they understand the cost of living in Canada is so high?

Enoch Omololu:
Yeah. So, that takes a while to get a hang of. What I find from [inaudible 00:13:26] in particular is once people sort out their issues with employment and all that initial settlement challenges, then the next thing they start thinking about is, "Okay, so how do I invest? How do I go about buying a home?" Because people are not thinking about actually establishing themselves in Canada. And for me personally, one of the shockers initially when I wanted to get a car first as I was completing my master's degree and I was getting a job, was I realized, well, I needed to have a credit score. And coming from Nigeria back then, we didn't have three digit credit rating systems in place. So I had no clue what a credit score was, credit issue and all of that. So of course, I was going to get a car loan and they were offering me rates that were absolutely ridiculous, because of course, my bank wasn't interested in extending credit to me.

Enoch Omololu:
So those are some of the challenges that I find newcomers come across at some point is because once you get into that readiness to start establishing yourself, then you have to think about things like growing your credit score, which means you need to take on some debt, because without debt and credit history of you paying back debt, unfortunately you won't have a great credit score. So then things about down payment, how do we go about getting the down payment? Well, how do you go about saving and not having to pay all these taxes? And then things like the TFSA come up. And then, "Okay now I got a house. I heard college education is very expensive in Canada. Are my kids going to have to take a loan?" Well maybe not if you start saving RESP.

Evelyn:
RESPs. Yeah.

Enoch Omololu:
Collecting grants and all of that. And then next thing people are thinking about, "Oh, you know what? I'm going to retire at some point. They say all these benefits are for people who have lived there all their lives, or I get just the small portion of the OAS," or all of that. Then they want to start learning about, "Okay, maybe this is how I can maximize this retirement account so that I can save towards retirement and then maybe this is how I can contribute to these programs or these pension plans, employer sponsored pension plans and all of that, just so I can also retire comfortably." So they start thinking about retirement. So I think it's stages for everyone, depending on when you come in, how you came in, the resources you came in with, and your personal circumstances.

Evelyn:
Wow. No, that's a lot of information and I can see that nobody tells you that. When my parents came to Canada in the seventies, they just were teaching each other. It was like, "Did you do this? Oh, how did you buy a house? Okay. We're going to go buy a house." You see somebody from the community, it's like, "Did you know this is what you do? Oh, I didn't know about this Canada grant." And so my dad was one of those people who was telling everybody, because he was here so much earlier than a lot of the people in the community to help them, like, "You got to start saving, you got to get a down payment." And you never have enough money. You always feel like you can wait longer, but the pricing of houses keep going up, and you regret it if you don't just jump in and do it at some point with planning and foresight.

Evelyn:
But I'm really happy that you've created this because I can't think of any other service or system or access, unless it's settlement services that just deal with your initial entry. They don't deal with the journey of becoming a citizen, from the beginning to end, and becoming economically stronger through that journey. I don't think that I know of any other service that provides this.

Evelyn:
Tell me, Enoch, how do you make money? How is this going to happen for you now that... Are you looking at banks for sponsorship and other organizations? Because this is their target, right? What you have built is going to target the kind of immigrants that they want to invest in for mortgages, for school fees. I'd love to hear about the plan to turn this into a real, significant entity.

Enoch Omololu:
Yeah. So, right now I do have lots of affiliations with financial institutions.

Evelyn:
Yeah. Good.

Enoch Omololu:
And because my tendency is to look for what saves people money overall. So investment wise, savings wise, checking accounts wise. So when it comes to services that everybody needs them anyways, but then I find them to be what I would use for myself as well as recommend to others, then I do join those affiliate programs. So for example, I just throw out some examples. So for example, everyone is looking for the best savings account, for example, the best savings interest rate. So as opposed to getting 0.01% on your savings account, if I am putting my money in an online bank that is paying me 1.25% for example, then I'm happy to promote that to my readers.

Evelyn:
For sure.

Enoch Omololu:
Or just anybody actually, who is looking for that information on Google. And they search for the best high interest savings account in Canada, hopefully they jump on my website. I get paid a commission for potentially if they sign up, they get access to the best rate available in Canada and it's a win-win for everybody.

Evelyn:
That's perfect. I can see that the Canadians will be using your site, because even for me and for us, even if we have financial planners and investor support, it's that language of understanding money and financial strategy that I think that no matter what, we all can do better. I'm sure most of the people, your site, or not even immigrants. I can see them being people that are in Canada, that are citizens maybe, that are still learning and want to maximize the knowledge that you're providing. Do you see that?

Enoch Omololu:
That's a great point to raise. So that's a nice-

Evelyn:
I'm joining your site right after this.

Enoch Omololu:
So when I signed in the fall of 2016, it was newcomers. And that was my goal because I knew nothing much in my opinion, so I was just going to teach somebody else who I felt was in the same shoes I was walking in. But to my surprise though, the people who were sending me questions and emails and all of that have lived here all their lives. And they were telling me, "Sorry, I feel a bit embarrassed, but can you help me out with this? I lived here all my life." I'm like, "Okay, maybe these resources are actually needed by every everyone."

Evelyn:
It's needed.

Enoch Omololu:
And the numbers actually tell the story in the sense that, for example, in the last 30 days, because I checked this just last week, in the last 30 days thereabout, we've had almost 600,000 unique visitors on Savvy New Canadians. Well, the fact is 90% of those, 85% of those have lived their older lives or were born in Canada.

Evelyn:
How can you tell?

Enoch Omololu:
Well, anecdotally, just based on the questions I get, I'm looking at percentages of newcomers versus people who tell yeah me they've live here all their lives, and then just appending that to the numbers, to the site itself, I estimate it in that range. So I think what happens is people are looking for information that summarizes the facts that they need and that also gets rid of all the excessive, what was the right word now? Technicalities, the language and all those terms that... It's the online world of today, they want quick and out.

Evelyn:
They do. They want straight information. And so you've also, I know, published some books and resources as well, in addition. So tell me about that. You've also authored books, is that what it is, finance books and eBooks?

Enoch Omololu:
Yes. So I do have two eBooks and those eBooks I wrote, one was in 2017, one was in 2018. Really, those books were targeting newcomers in particular. So the first one was how to buy a home in Canada. And it just detailed, it takes people from step one to the last step, how I did it myself, what I went through, the processes I went through, what I looked at, what I thought about, the mistakes I made and how to avoid them.

Evelyn:
All of us.

Enoch Omololu:
Yeah. And then the second one is tied to understanding Canada's retirement income system, again, targeting newcomers in the sense that it gives them an overview of all the programs, all the pension programs, how they start, how they work, eligibility requirements, how much you going to expect to get, how you can potentially maximize those benefits, strategies to avoid claw backs and all of that, and then ends with insights into how to invest in general. So in addition to those benefits, you don't want to rely on them 100%. How to invest your money so that you could potentially retire comfortably.

Evelyn:
Wow. That is fabulous. So this is a passion that's turning into an enterprise. I love it. I love it.

Enoch Omololu:
Oh yeah. Oh yeah. Oh yeah. It's something I like doing for sure.

Evelyn:
Yeah. You can tell. And I think it's great that you're doing something that gives you such fulfillment, but also you know that you're impacting people, and not just immigrants. You are making a difference to people here in Canada, and it sounds like you get millions of visitors a year on your site. So you're really creating a movement, which I think is important. And honestly, for immigrants too to recognize the importance of financial knowledge. One thing that I see in my profession is many immigrants, highly educated coming in, business owners from other countries coming in, but yet they're starting all over again. And I feel like they need to learn how we can create legacy for our children, because a lot of times people here already have that legacy, they have the inheritance, they have the this and that.

Evelyn:
And even if we have something back home, it's not something that's going to really be as valuable. So I love that. As we say, in immigration, we're allowing people to come here and create legacy so that they can pass along the opportunities to their younger family members or children. But then financial legacy and financial literacy needs to be passed down as well. What do you think about that? Because our parents may not always... I don't know, my parents, they did the best they could. They weren't as educated as my sister and I, we're both lawyers, but we were educated here because they moved here. And I think if your family members don't have financial knowledge, it's hard to pass it down. So how are you thinking about how you educate these new immigrants or even the Canadians, how they can communicate and translate that down to the next generation? This is really where wealth is created, I find, right?

Enoch Omololu:
Yeah, that makes sense. So what happens is using myself as an example again, I tie a lot of my "financial success" back my parents, because one, they're Nigerians, but then growing up, they passed on all these nuances, all these lessons and learnings about money, how to save, avoid debt and all of that. While all those learnings, not everything is applicable in Canada. For example, here you have to take on debt, but overall, the baseline is solid and that helps me personally, to succeed financially. In addition to that also is helping me get an education, supporting my educational case and stuff like that.

Enoch Omololu:
So for Savvy New Canadians, the idea is when you have newcomers who come into Canada and they quickly understand the concept of investing for example, and they understand that compounding interest is your best friend and time, because the longer you actually use for investing, the better your chances of growing that portfolio, growing your net worth and then succeeding financially. Now, the trickle-down effect of that is when parents succeed financially and they learn about things like the RESPs on time and then they use those RESPs to potentially increase the chances of their kids going to college, because they don't have to take on all this debt, then I see that as being opportunities to actually pass onto legacies, helping your kids go to school, helping them get post secondary education, you yourself succeeding financially so that your kids are not pressured to have to leave school and go make a living.

Enoch Omololu:
So I think overall, if an immigrant is successful financially, the chances are that their descendants are going to also succeed. So again, in a small way, we are trying to help people along those journeys.

Evelyn:
Oh, I think it's so powerful. And we need to think about this. People don't always see immigrants as contributing in the same way. This is why I'm always like, you have no idea. I can talk to an immigrant from Australia, which I just talked to, who owns a $200 million business, wants to move to Canada. That's an immigrant. They think of immigrants usually as visible or poor, and not educated. And I think what you're doing is really shifting that perspective, and I think it's empowering people who look like us or who don't look like us, even who are Canadian born, to see the value of planning, and they may be intimidated like you say, by working with a financial advisor or an investment firm, and don't know how to do that.

Evelyn:
So you create a real entrance, an opening for them to develop that literacy on financial strategy. So I think it's incredible. Can I just ask you, Enoch, as we're wrapping up, let's say immigrants in the five year, 10 year, 15 years, what do you see is the progression of some of their issues? Do you see that? What changes in terms of their financial planning or strategies that they're able to start to process in 5, 10, 15 years of being here?

Enoch Omololu:
So I think once people get the hump of settling in, so that's using me again as an example, I think the first five years, you're really trying to establish yourself, find a direction, get yourself a great job that is commensurated to your skills, and then getting you home, establish your family, and then just settling in. Following that, what I like to see and not necessarily what I have seen because again, that would be anecdotal evidence, but what I would like to see for myself and for others is in 10 years, you should already have established yourself. You should already have put in place financial planning tools for your retirement so that time is counting. You're growing your portfolio. And in that timeframe as well, if you have kids, you have things like these RESPs in place, maximizing those government grants, taking advantage of all those benefits, growing your portfolio, getting your kids to school, encouraging them to pursue post secondary as applicable.

Enoch Omololu:
And again, depending on your age when you actually arrive in Canada, if you arrive in Canada in your fifties, for example, then obviously you have to extend the timelines, because now you have maybe 10 years to 15 years to retirement. You want to focus on those retirement accounts to make sure that you're actually growing them, maximizing those tax sheltered returns. And now looking down 15 years, well, I've met a lot of immigrants here and I think really, Canada is a haven for opportunities. I would say the majority of immigrants I have met have taken advantage of those opportunities to grow businesses, establish themselves, become employers themselves. So really adding back to their communities, paying taxes, unbelievable taxes that people... Sometimes I come across people, I'm like, you know what? When people look at immigrants and they're like, "No, these people are just freeloaders." Well, maybe take a look at what-

Evelyn:
We are paying our taxes.

Enoch Omololu:
... taxes they're paying and the amounts they're actually paying. So I think overall, over time, adding back to Canada and being great citizen citizens overall.

Evelyn:
Yes. I really, really agree with you. I think this is wonderful what you're doing. One of the last pieces of information I'd love to ask you is, a lot of times people come here and they don't know what to expect. Is there one piece of financial advice before people immigrate, that you think you would want people to know, that maybe even from my perspective and my team, we can start sharing? Because they ask me things like, "Where should I live? Should I go to Vancouver or Toronto?" And I'm like, "Well, think about Alberta or Manitoba." Because I'm from Vancouver originally. I don't live there for a reason. I worked in Toronto for 12 years and I sold my place there and moved to Calgary because you get more house for your money. So I try to give them my tips and tricks, but if they're set on Vancouver or Toronto, they need to know the cost of living is high.

Evelyn:
What do you think we should be telling immigrants financially or giving them a piece of advice around what to expect when they come? Because I don't think they're ever ready for the cost, no matter whether they're a wealthy person from South Africa, or they're coming from a small town in the village somewhere, they still are shocked, I think by the cost of living here.

Enoch Omololu:
Yeah. Before I answer your question, just a plug in for Manitoba.

Evelyn:
Exactly.

Enoch Omololu:
I think a lot of immigrants-

Evelyn:
Got to Manitoba.

Enoch Omololu:
... starting out should actually think about Manitoba, because I came here as a student, so it wasn't deliberate, but honestly from chatting with other people in other provinces, Manitoba is a great place to start off as a new immigrant.

Evelyn:
I think so too.

Enoch Omololu:
... to get your foot in, get yourself established and then you can do whatever you want.

Evelyn:
You can buy. I think Manitoba is great. Alberta's great. Saskatchewan. People need to think, even on the East coast, there's so much more affordability as opposed to buying a million dollar apartment. They need to recognize that they will be freer if they're able to afford their lifestyles when you get here, because they don't expect it to be so expensive. Food, everything is high. So if you can have housing that is more affordable, it sets you up for success. I totally agree. But what else would you tell a new immigrant before they arrived in terms of their money?

Enoch Omololu:
So what I would mention actually the first on my list and what I tell people is, bring as much money as you can afford to. Not everybody has the largess to just dig their hands into forms, but I advise people to save as much as you can because it's going to help you a lot. One, when you get here, you're going to be forced to take up just any job. It gives you more flexibility to try and pursue those other things you need to actually establish yourself. So if it means taking exams, going back to school.

Enoch Omololu:
Bringing in as much forms as you can afford to is really my number one advice, because once you do that, like you mentioned already, you set yourself up for success because now you have more flexibility. There's less stress on your life. You can take some time to breathe, think, plan, while trying to sort things out. Of course, if that is not possible, my next advice for everyone really is when you come in here, you want to set yourself, prepare your mind to persist, work hard and just keep on those goals until you achieve them. I think this place gives you the room to do whatever you want to do, as long as you are willing to put in the effort. And having that mindset helps a lot.

Evelyn:
Yeah, you're right. I think money mindset is also really important. I think when people come sometimes. I've seen, "Well, I was a doctor back home, and I hear it, and I feel it, and I know that the struggle is real." And if you want to do that again, you need to know. I always say, please prepare before you come. Check with the colleges or the association. You can't just come and think you're going to be doing the same thing. Also, for me, I always of course prepare them for doing research or have a job to come to. That immediately changes things if you're coming as an intercompany corporate executive, transferring versus coming as a caregiver. You have to know what the reality is.

Evelyn:
And so I think we both do our parts to help, but I think no matter who you are when they arrive, there's still a lot of sticker shock and adjustment to everything, from the climate to the cost of living. But I've been in Canada now for 45 years and I'm just so grateful that my parents were able to do this as immigrants and create the legacy that you're also creating for your family, that now I'm creating for my family because we've been able to be successful here in Canada. So very grateful.

Evelyn:
Enoch, thank you so much. Is there anything else you'd love to share with our podcast listeners? Besides, I'm going to direct them to your website, Savvy New Canadians website so that they can learn. And even those of us who are old Canadians, we can always learn more from you.

Enoch Omololu:
Oh yeah. Nothing much to add, other than to wish everyone all the best of luck, and pay attention to your finances, start early, keep going at it and time is your best friend.

Evelyn:
Thank you so much. I really appreciate your time, and I look forward to joining your website, seeing what else I can learn. Take good care.

Enoch Omololu:
You're welcome. You too.

Evelyn:
Thank you.


Evelyn L. Ackah, BA, LL.B.

Founder/Managing Lawyer

Ms. Ackah is passionate about immigration law because it focuses on people and relationships, which are at the core of her personal values. Starting her legal career as a corporate/commercial ...

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Davina Frederick Esq is an attorney, law firm growth and wealth strategist and the Founder and CEO at Wealthy Woman Lawyer, LLC®. Davina combined her expertise in marketing and her ...

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Episode 32: Canada Lawyer and Entrepreneur Sara Forte: Not Your Average Law Job

Sara Forte is an employment, labour lawyer and workplace human rights lawyer and founder of Forte Law, based in Surrey, BC. Sara and her team advise employers, employees and unions ...

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Episode 31: Legal Entrepreneur Erin Cowling, CEO & Founder of Flex Legal: The Legal Side Hustle

Former corporate litigator turned freelance litigator and legal entrepreneur Erin Cowling is the Founder & CEO of Flex Legal Network, a network of experienced freelance lawyers ...

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Episode 30: Calgary Lawyer Charles Fair of Fair Legal - On Your Side When Life Gets Messy

Calgary Lawyer Charles Fair and Evelyn Ackah discuss Fair Legal in Calgary and his practice in criminal, civil and family law on the Ask Canada Immigration Lawyer Evelyn Ackah Podcast. ...

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When I decided to open a Canadian branch of Bright Solutions for Dyslexia, my CPA found two attorneys who could assist me. One was Evelyn Ackah. The other attorney was part of a very large, well-known law firm in Vancouver.

I spoke with both of them and chose Evelyn Ackah -- and I do not regret it.

Evelyn responds rapidly and personally, by phone or email -- even on weekends.

She explained my options in easy-to-understand layman's terms, she created everything I needed quickly, and she helped prepare me for the business immigration interview.

Everything went extremely well, and I was granted the maximum length work permit.

Evelyn Ackah's firm helped me complete that entire process within 2 months. It took the other large law firm more than 3 weeks just to schedule an initial phone call -- and I finally got their bill for that phone call AFTER I already had my work permit.

If you want fast, professional, and accurate legal service, I highly recommend Evelyn Ackah.

– Susan Barton, Founder Bright Solutions for Dyslexia

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