(403) 452-9515

Ackah Law

Search Ackah Law...

Contact us

Contact Information

1 (403) 452-9515

1 (800) 932-1190

contact@ackahlaw.com

Book a Consultation

More Options...

Temporary Resident Permit

If you are refused entry to Canada because of criminal inadmissibility due to a criminal charge or conviction incident in your past, there may still be ways to enter the country. To be eligible for a Temporary Resident Permit (TRP), your need to enter or stay in Canada must outweigh the health or safety risks to Canadian society, as determined by an immigration or a border services officer.

PODCAST EPISODE 4: OVERCOMING CRIMINAL INADMISSIBILITY TO ENTER CANADA OR THE UNITED STATES

If it has been less than five years since your court sentence was completed and you have a compelling reason to enter Canada, you may be able to obtain a Temporary Resident Permit. This is a document that allows you to enter and remain in Canada despite your status as inadmissible. According to IRCC,

"Your need to enter or stay in Canada must outweigh the health or safety risks to Canadian society, as determined by an immigration or a border services officer. Even if the reason you are inadmissible seems minor, you must demonstrate that your visit is justified."

Temporary Resident Permits are issued for fixed periods of time, and you must leave Canada by the expiry date or get a new one before the original document expires. Obtaining a Temporary Resident Permit requires an application to be submitted. As with all applications, there are fees associated with Temporary Resident Permits.

If you are a citizen of a country that requires an eTA and are refused an eTA, you may be issued a Temporary Resident Permit depending on the nature and circumstances of the inadmissibility and the continuing rationale for travel. The TRP is no longer valid once you leave Canada unless you have a special re-entry Permit.

Episode 4: Overcoming Criminal Inadmissibility to Enter Canada or the United States

Show Notes: One of the most stressful issues for people traveling to Canada or the United States is criminal inadmissibility. DUIs, an assault, possession of marijuana convictions ...

Read More

Criminal Inadmissibility to Enter Canada or the U.S.: Facebook Live May 21

Immigration Lawyer Evelyn Ackah Answers Your Questions about Criminal Inadmissibility to Enter Canada or the U.S.: Your Options Including U.S. Visa Waivers, TRPs and Rehabilitation ...

Read More

6 Months In: What Employees Who Travel Between Canada and the U.S. Need to Know About Cannabis Legalization

Canada legalized the recreational use of marijuana 6 months ago, in October 2018. Employees who travel between Canada and the United States continue to have concerns about how legalized ...

Read More

How Marijuana Impaired Driving Penalties Can Result in Deportation from Canada

Canada legalized the recreational use of cannabis in October 2018, and on December 18, 2018, Canada enacted new impaired driving penalties and the maximum penalty for most of these ...

Read More

How to Enter Canada If You've Been Convicted of Marijuana Use or Related Crimes

The headlines are frequently featured U.S. entertainers such as comedian Russell Brand, actors Wes Brantley and Lindsay Lohan, rappers DMX and Kodak Black, or actor who has been ...

Read More

Medical Conditions That Can Prevent You From Entering Canada

There are medical conditions that can make someone medically inadmissible to enter Canada and live in Canada on a permanent basis. On June 1, 2018, IRCC made significant changes to ...

Read More

Featured Resource

Calculate Your Express Entry Score

Are you qualified to move to Canada? Express Entry is Canada's skilled-worker immigration application process for high-skilled foreign workers and international students who ...

View Resource

It is hard enough in the normal course of business to obtain permanent resident status in Canada. Imagine the difficulty in gaining that status with a 36 year old developmentally disabled daughter. That was our experience. My husband had been recruited for the C.E.O. position at the Calgary Public Library. Even the process to obtain temporary work permits for all three of our family members took some time and effort. The Ackah Firm was with us every step of the way. They gave us good advice, managed the paperwork and kept my husband’s employer informed. They were also proactive by insisting that we get on with the process of permanent residency in a timely fashion. Again their experience and knowledge paid off. They utilized other legal expertise to make a case that our daughter would not be a burden to the Country or the Province. They were respectful of our point of view that despite her disabilities she had always been an active and engaged member of the community. We were pleased that permanent residence for parents and child came through fully six months before the temporary status expired.

– Margaret and Bill Ptacek

View All Testimonials