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5 Commonly Asked Questions About Business Travel to Canada

Blog posted on by Evelyn Ackah in Business Travel to Canada

5 Commonly Asked Questions About Business Travel to Canada

Many international people need to enter Canada temporarily for business travel such as meetings, training or providing a service to their customers but do not become part of Canada's labour market. Business visitors to Canada usually stay in Canada for a few days or a few weeks but may be able to stay for up to 6 months. According to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), to qualify as a business visitor to Canada, you must be able to show that:

  • you plan to stay for less than 6 months
  • you don’t plan to enter the Canadian labour market
  • your main place of business and source of income and profits is outside Canada
  • you have documents that support your application
  • you meet Canada’s basic entry requirements:
    • have a valid travel document, such as a passport
    • have enough money for your stay and to return home
    • plan to leave Canada at the end of your visit
    • are not a criminal, security or health risk to Canadians

5 FAQs About Business Travel to Canada

  1. What Documents Do I Need to Enter Canada?
    Depending on your nationality and where you are travelling from, to enter Canada as a business traveller you need the following documentation:
    1. a passport or travel document that is valid for your entire stay
    2. a valid visitor visa, if applicable
    3. if you need an electronic travel authorization (eTA), you must travel using the same passport you used in your application
    4. if you’re a lawful permanent resident of the United States, a valid green card (or equivalent official proof of status in the U.S.) and a valid passport from your country of nationality (or an equivalent document)
    5. letters of support from your parent company and a letter of invitation from the Canadian host business or a Letter of Recognition from the Canada Border Services Agency
    6. other documents such as warranty or service agreements, or contracts, if relevant to your visit
    7. 24-hour contact details of your business host in Canada
    8. proof that you have enough money for both your stay in Canada and your return home
    9. proof of COVID-19 vaccination
  2. Do Business Travellers Need a Work Permit?
    Business travellers to Canada usually only need a work permit if they plan to stay longer than 6 months.
  3. How Do I Submit My Required Travel and Contact Information?
    All travellers are required to enter their travel information in the ArriveCAN app or website 72 hours before entering Canada.
    1. ArriveCAN's "saved traveller" feature allows a user to save travel documents and proof of vaccination information so that they can reuse it on future trips. which saves time and increases convenience.
      • travel and contact information
      • quarantine plan
      • COVID-19 symptom self-assessment
      Bring your ArriveCAN receipt (electronic or paper) with you to show the border services officer upon arrival.
  4. Do I Need to Be Fully Vaccinated As A Business Traveller to Canada?
    Business travellers who are not fully vaccinated are only allowed entry under certain circumstances and will need to test for Covid before and after arrival and quarantine for 14 days.
  5. I Had An Old DUI. Can I Visit Canada for Business?
    Inadmissibility to Canada for criminal reasons can affect your ability to do your job - even for a crime that was many years ago or was forgiven or pardoned. The most common reasons that you could be deemed inadmissible to enter Canada as a business visitor are:
    • Conviction of a crime (in Canada or outside of it)
    • Involvement in organized crime
    • Involvement in human rights violations
    • Committed an act in a foreign nation that is a crime under Canadian law
    • Certain financial, health or security reason

If you have been convicted of a crime and are afraid you will be turned away at the border and unable to enter Canada, or fear you may be denied entry, you may want to consider gaining access to Canada by being "deemed" rehabilitated. This is going to depend on how long it has been since the crime was committed. If enough time has passed since all of the conditions of the sentence for the conviction were met, you may be eligible for deemed rehabilitated.

A Canada immigration lawyer can research your case and help you file for a waiver, be deemed rehabilitated or identify a compelling reason why you need to travel, such as work or a family emergency. A waiver may last for only one year, or for several years - each case is unique.

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Other Ways Business People Can Work In Canada

Business people who are not visitors and who want to live and work in Canada include foreign business professionals, intra-company transferees and traders and investors.

    Business people who want to come to Canada for business under a free trade agreement can enter and work in Canada for longer than 6 months if they qualify under one of these agreements:

    Don't Get Turned Away at the Border!

    Do You Have Questions About Business Travel to Canada?
    Contact Ackah Law BEFORE You Travel

    An experienced Canadian immigration lawyer can save you time and stress - and prevent costly mistakes and missed deadlines. With 50+ years of combined immigration experience, our immigration legal team can identify and resolve potential problems BEFORE they happen. Contact Ackah Business Immigration Law today to discuss your situation at 403-452‑9515.


    Evelyn L. Ackah, BA, LL.B.

    Founder/Managing Lawyer

    Ms. Ackah is passionate about immigration law because it focuses on people and relationships, which are at the core of her personal values. Starting her legal career as a corporate/commercial ...

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